KM Adoption and Engagement Strategy

It’s pretty upfront, but sometimes we tend to ignore the basics. I’m sharing this piece by Simon Goh more a reminder of the steps we need to take for engaging individuals. It also has some interesting tips.

So what’s adoption and engagement…

Adoption is ingrained in an organisation when people say “We need to do it”.

When someone is engaged, we hear them saying “I can see why I should do it”.

Adoption and Engagement workshop

  • Step 1 – Set the context
  • Step 2 – Identify factors of non-participation
  • Step 3 – Identify factors of participation
  • Step 4 – Develop themes
  • Step 5 – Brainstorm ideas
  • Step 6 – Prioristise ideas
  • Step 7 – Define the action plan

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Very Close to my Heart: Creating a Bully-free Workplace

For those who know me well, they know the issue of bullies in the workplace is an issue very close to my heart. It is amazing how much bullies can suck the motivation out of a team and how this can have a direct impact on performance. You can hire the most competent people on the planet, but if you subject them to bullies, you will ruin them.

A startling 37% of American workers — roughly 54 million people — have been bullied at work according to a 2007 survey by the Workplace Bullying Institute. The consequences of such bullying spreading to the targets’ families, coworkers, and organizations. Costs include reduced creativity, low morale, and increased turnover — all factors that weigh heavily on the bottom line.

Among targets of bullying, 40% never told their employers and, of those who did, 62% reported that they were ignored. This suggests there’s a significant opportunity to increase profits and beat the competition by eliminating the prevalence of workplace bullying in your organization. But how?

The first step is to identify the root of the problem.

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From the Innovative Mind of Janey Clarey: Instructional Design by Example Blog

Janet Clarey is one of my favorite bloggers on the topic of training and developement. It is no surprise that she has kicked off this absolutely fabulous idea of blogging about real life instructional design examples.

I wish her the best of luck possible and am thinking up an example to contribute in the very near future.

Corporate e-learning needs another blog. Oh yes. It does.

In this blog, you’ll find examples of e-learning courses and details about the instructional design process used in creating them. You’ll also find specifics about the logistics of the courses. Anyone is welcome to submit an example using the submission form. The site is maintained by Janet Clarey.

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Optimal KM: Distinguishing Know-What from Know-How

Great comprehensive piece by John Tropea on making the clear distinction between informal information management and knowledge management. It is a call to push current knowledge management practices further.

My thinking is that just the sharing aspect of informal stuff is “know-what”, this is what KM has been about, but we need to go further to the “know-how” ie. to learn and to be able to have the skills to come up with your own “know-what”. We can do this via conversations. We can now converse with people who shared their informal information, and not only know “what” but also “how”…the ultimate example is apprenticeship and mentoring.

Connect, Context, Engage, Interactions

So let’s get it right. Knowledge doesn’t exist independent from a person.

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Wireframing Tools for Mockups and Prototypes

Great list and commentary on desktop and online wireframing tools to create mockups and prototypes for when pen and paper just aren’t enough.

Like most things today, the world of interaction design moves quickly. Although a pen and notebook may suffice when it comes to simply jotting down ideas, planning a series of website screens can sometimes demand additional precision and cohesion.

This is where today’s wireframing tools come in. Engineered to make the design process as intuitive as possible, these tools allow you to construct a visual representation of your interface. Some even allow designers to construct interactive prototypes in order to receive user feedback before a single line of code is written. The following list comprises 15 of the most prominent wireframing applications available today.

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Improve Your Speeches

I could have used these three steps to better speeches a few days ago. I’m always looking for techniques to be a better public speaker.

First, step out from behind the podium and choreograph your relationship to the audience.

Second, listen to your audience.

Finally, focus on your emotional intentions for approximately three minutes before important meetings and speeches.

Practice these three shortcuts to effective leadership communications and watch the bar go up — way up — on your performances.

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The New Paradigm of Advantage

Great take by Umair Haque on the necessary paradigm shift that companies must in order to be agents of change rather than simply agents of opportunity. Author Umair Haque writes that the 21st century demands from firms of all stripes: a paradigm shift in the nature of advantage.

Here’s something you might not know. There’s enough food in the world to feed pretty much everyone. So why are more than 1 billion people — nearly 20% of the world’s population — either starving or malnourished? And why, over the last two decades, has global hunger steeply risen?

The answer has everything to do with the past — and future — of advantage.

The past of advantage was extractive and protective. The future of advantage, on the other hand, is allocative and creative.

Allocative advantage asks: are we able to match people with what makes them durably, tangibly better off — and can we do it 10x or 100x better than our rivals?

Creative advantage asks: is our strategic imagination 10x or 100x richer, faster, and deeper than our rivals?

Extractive advantage asks: how can we transfer value from stakeholders to us, 10x or 100x better than our rivals?

Protective advantage asks: are buyers and suppliers locked in to dealing with us, 10x or 100x more tightly than to rivals?

He even makes a Prezi about it.

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The Ethnography of Design

I’ve been looking at ethnographical studies to determine how researchers and experts collaborate. Of course, this proposes that ethnographic analysis can inform design. This leads me to reflect further on the impact of the research results on the way that online environements in which researchers and experts collaborate are designed.

Ethnography is a research method in which the researcher observes people in their natural environment so as to gain insight into the ways in which people inhabit their spaces, use their products and interact with the various physical, social, economical and ecological systems around them. It is a heavily qualitative research method, involving much participant-observation — observing and recording the actions and decision-making processes of individuals and groups in a given environment.

There are several different ways in which ethnographic methods can be used in the design world:

  • an ethnographer collects data and reports to a designer
  • an ethnographer and designer work together and study a certain population
  • an ethnographer, designer and end-user collaborate as a team

and so on…

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Facebook Cheatsheet (or how I Adore Diagrams)

Leave it to Andy Wibbels to explain everything in a well designed diagram.

You’re not crazy: Facebook’s interface is hard to learn. Sure posting things and sharing is pretty straighforward, but if you want to figure out what goes where and who can see it, that is a bit more of a challenge. I took some time on the plane to Charlotte to put together a cheatsheet. Click here to download the Facebook Cheatsheet (PDF, 135kb).

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