KM Adoption and Engagement Strategy

It’s pretty upfront, but sometimes we tend to ignore the basics. I’m sharing this piece by Simon Goh more a reminder of the steps we need to take for engaging individuals. It also has some interesting tips.

So what’s adoption and engagement…

Adoption is ingrained in an organisation when people say “We need to do it”.

When someone is engaged, we hear them saying “I can see why I should do it”.

Adoption and Engagement workshop

  • Step 1 – Set the context
  • Step 2 – Identify factors of non-participation
  • Step 3 – Identify factors of participation
  • Step 4 – Develop themes
  • Step 5 – Brainstorm ideas
  • Step 6 – Prioristise ideas
  • Step 7 – Define the action plan

Reference:

“Lead, Follow, or Get Out of the Way” Has Never Rang So True

Radical innovation is a proposal or idea and not a product. It is user-centered and focussed on meaning.

What is your innovation strategy?

In his book, “Design-Driven Innovation“, author Roberto Verganti outlines a framework for mapping strategy for innovation as a radical change in meanings. Check out his thinking in the diagram below:

Design-Driven Innovation

As your company maps its innovation strategy, this distinction of radical innovation of meanings rather than features may be noteworthy in your product development. If you’re not thinking about radical innovation right now, you can be sure your competitor is. Lead, follow, or get out of the way has never rang so true.

Reference:

Can a Goofball be Taken Seriously?

We all have our expressions. One of mine is goofball. It’s not too rude (mind you I’m careful about who I call a goofball), and kind of silly, and reminds me of this guy. Sometimes I use it with affection, sometimes with friendly sarcasm and sometimes when faced with adversity. I even refer to myself often as being a goofball, goofing off, goofing around, etc.

I like to laugh and make people laugh. I’m even goofy sometimes when I’m teaching; it’s my way of being entertaining. It doesn’t always go over well, not everyone appreciates my humour. But more often then not, it does. And people find me approachable because I’m not all stuck up, but rather a bit goofy. It’s like if you spend any amount of time with Thiagi, an ultimate goofball, you’ll hear him refer to himself as stupid. Of course, he’s goofing around.

However, I sometimes wonder if it might come across as unprofessional. Janet Clarey actually raises some important questions about how we perceive professionalism in a blog post about business communication.

But Chris Brogan got me really thinking about this with his blog post entitled The Importance of Being Funny. He displays, what I would characterize as, a picture of him being a goofball (Chris, I say that with the utmost respect 🙂 ). Chris tackles the issue of how funny is perceived and how it is sometimes necessary and how it impacts storytelling.

Ok, so every picture tells a story. A picture is worth a thousand words. Yadda3. So when my good friend Sonia decided to do a photoshoot for me a while back, we narrowed the best pics down to about 10. The picture on the left is the one I use 90% of the time when I have to submit a professional picture. The picture on the right is my friends’ favorite. Why? Well Sonia, the photographer, said it was the picture that captured me the best. It tells the best story about who is Kristina Schneider. My response was that these were business photos… I’m rethinking this right now.

Can you take a goofball headshot seriously?
Can you take a goofball headshot seriously?

 

Steve Woodruff wrote a blogpost entitled Your Personal Brand – Does it Matter? in which he argues:

People often question if they “need” a personal brand. Here’s the news – you already HAVE a personal brand. The only questions are, what is it? And are you projecting it effectively?

I think this is bang on.

But can goofballness be part of that brand or does it harm that brand?

Ultimately, can a goofball be taken seriously?

Or perhaps, how well known do you have to be before you can get away with being a goofball.

References:

Dropping the “e” – A Sign of the Times!

My title has recently been changed from Director of eLearning to Director, Blended Learning Strategies. Yesterday I received my new business cards and had the opportunity to hand them out for the first time today. They were well received. Actually, one of the comments was “oh, so you do more then just eLearning then?”, which is exactly the response I was looking for.

I think a few years ago, when there was the second boom of eLearning, it was strategic to have such a title. However, lately I found that it limited me more then anything, and more often then not, I was grouped with the IT people rather then the education, training and performance people. Of course I’m a bit of both, and this new title is more representative.

And perhaps also strategic. Since we can learn just about anywhere, anytime and with a multiplicity of methods, the idea of segregating the “eLearning” for the rest of the learning process is in my opinion quickly becoming outdated. A comprehensive learning strategy will have a blend of various learning solutions.

Assumptions about eLearning

eLearning is a human performance improvement initiative that employs electronic technology. By that definition, consulting an Internet-based dictionary to find out the meaning of a word is a form of eLearning. Indeed learning is occurring, therefore improving performance by the means of an electronic technology. Though it is incidental and informal, it falls within the parameters of eLearning.

One of the pitfalls many encounter when developing an eLearning strategy is ignoring the wide spectrum of eLearning possibilities. They limit their potential by centering their approach around the digitization of content via impressive technology. They forget that, much like in the case of the user consulting the Internet-based dictionary, meaningful learning is personal, context-related and most effective when answering a specific need.

This error often occurs because somewhere along the line, we forgot that learning is an activity and we tried to turn it into a product. We packaged it, made it stand-alone and made it so universal that it lost its meaning. This approach might have been successful for short tutorials but doesn’t work well within an eLearning strategy geared towards performance improvement.

7 Assumptions About eLearning

Because it’s online, it’s interactive – Not necessarily. Too often, courseware applications are simply digitized content and are limited to back/next type navigation. Their evaluation components are often limited to rote memory testing. This approach doesn’t take into account the need for personalised and contextualised learning. When we develop an eLearning program, we need it to truly engage the learner via contextual interactivity, getting the learner to truly reflect. These strategies need to be built into the design in order to promote meaningful learning.

eLearning is about putting content online – If this were the case, eLearning costs could be reduced considerably by converting all textbooks to eBooks. We know however that the process of creating the right context and environment for meaningful learning is more complex. An instructional design strategy to breakdown, organize and contextualise content with the goal of teaching concepts and strategies geared at improving performance is required.

eLearning is essentially classroom training online – By now, you should recognise that this is a very limited view of eLearning. eLearning encompasses the wide spectrum of performance improving interventions using technology, for example intranets, knowledge portals, performance support systems, communities of practice, peer-to-peer discussion groups or synchronous text chat, voice or video based course conferencing. For optimal results, the type of eLearning used in must be aligned with the performance and learning objectives.

Using a wide variety of media will accommodate individual learning styles – Again, not necessarily. The degree to which an eLearning program caters to various learning styles is determined by the methodology used at the design and development stage. Certainly, including sound, images, video, animation and text throughout the program will ensure a greater equity for all types of learners. But more importantly, knowing which media best relates which kind of content and activity is a design technique that ensures that the information is communicated in the most optimal manner.

Better technology makes for better eLearning – Technology is simply a support. Finding the best technology to enhance the learning strategy is imperative. However, the best technology in a given instance doesn’t necessarily mean the latest or most impressive technology on the market. One of the biggest pitfalls of eLearning development is letting the technology drive the program. Rather, it is important to determine what the technological needs are and then find the best technology to meet those needs.

Technological improvements means eLearning improvements – Technological improvements can definitely mean lower development and implementation costs, it can improve navigational option and usability aspects, but it doesn’t guarantee a better instructional strategy or design. Technology can assist in the gathering and analysis of the information required to develop your strategy, but cannot develop the strategy. In addition, as technology becomes more complex and sophisticated, designing to exploit the full potential of the technology becomes an even greater challenge.

eLearning is expensive to produce, implement and update – If the wrong approach is used, it most definitely can be. Initial needs assessment, instructional design, prototype development and analysis, change management strategies and planned updates are all strategies that can reduce the costs of eLearning development. They should all be part of your strategy. In fact, the most expensive mistake in eLearning development is using the wrong eLearning strategy and having the project fail as a result.

Developing an eLearning Strategy

In order to make your performance improvement driven eLearning strategy a success, you must:

  • Perform a front-end systemic analysis of performance needs and organisational objectives;
  • Profile your learners, understanding their learning styles, needs, abilities and availabilities as well as the factors that will motivate them to participate;
  • Plan the development of your project with sufficient time and with milestones and deliverables;
  • Develop a prototype in the early stages to ensure that your project is on the right track. The prototype will also give you a better idea of what the project will look like, permitting you adjust your strategy early on and get a better idea when costing the rest of the project;
  • Implement a change management strategy and identify early on areas which will require updates, which in turn will help reduce costs;
  • Develop a promotional strategy to get learners motivated once the eLearning program is implemented. This might require getting some learners on board early on;
  • Evaluate your eLearning program regularly and make the required changes.

eLearning is a human performance improvement initiative that employs electronic technology. By that definition, consulting an Internet-based dictionary to find out the meaning of a word is a form of eLearning. Indeed learning is occurring, therefore improving performance by the means of an electronic technology. Though it is incidental and informal, it falls within the parameters of eLearning.

One of the pitfalls many encounter when developing an eLearning strategy is ignoring the wide spectrum of eLearning possibilities. They limit their potential by centering their approach around the digitization of content via impressive technology. They forget that, much like in the case of the user consulting the Internet-based dictionary, meaningful learning is personal, context-related and most effective when answering a specific need.

This error often occurs because somewhere along the line, we forgot that learning is an activity and we tried to turn it into a product. We packaged it, made it stand-alone and made it so universal that it lost its meaning. This approach might have been successful for short tutorials but doesn’t work well within an eLearning strategy geared towards performance improvement.