Getting Ideas Off the Ground

In yesterday’s blog post, I wrote about how one must work at becoming successful, presenting Doug Belshaw’s reflections. Rosabeth Moss Kanter made a post along the same lines that presents five powers that successfully get ideas of the ground, which are:

  1. Showing up: the importance of being there in person.
  2. Speaking up: the framing the debate and articulating the consensus.
  3. Teaming up: the importance of partners, teams and communities.
  4. Looking up: the importance of seeing the picture, articulating setting strong values and setting sights high.
  5. Not giving up: the importance of persevering and being optimistic.

I can personally speak to the importance of these five powers. The first power, in particular, is an important one to remind ourselves of. In this era of digital communication and Web conferencing, there is nothing like being face to face with someone to foster strong relationship building.

The blogger concludes by reminding us that:

Achieving goals is always a matter of hard work, and success is never guaranteed.

And of course, as W.C. Fields put it:

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Every effort brought forward, every attempt is a learning opportunity and valuable experience.

Reference:

Initially published on Brandon Hall’s Workplace Learning Today

Successful People Work at Being Successful

Doug Belshaw wrote a great reflection piece yesterday on the qualities of being successful.

Talent doesn’t make you successful because talent is just a word which sums up three different character traits. These can all be developed; they’re not ‘innate’.

People who are successful tend to be:

  1. Confident
  2. Tenacious
  3. Articulate

I quite like Doug’s perspective as it suggests that if someone applies themselves, they have the capacity to be successful. I compare this perspective the Roman Philosopher Seneca’s quote:

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.

Equally as powerful is a quote from motivational speaker Bob Nelson:

The biggest mistake in life is to think that you work for someone else. True, you may have a boss and you may collect a paycheck from a company but ultimately, you are the master of your own destiny. You decide what potential you reach in your career and what you will eventually accomplish in your life.

The bottom line is that people aren’t just successful or lucky, but rather they work at it.

Reference:

Initially published on Brandon Hall’s Workplace Learning Today

Tips for Staying Organized and Efficient When on the Go

Helpful article by Gina Trapani presenting techniques of how to stay organized when travelling for work. She calls on David Allen, author of Getting Things Done with whom she co-created a clever little Popplet* with some easy tips to implement.

*Note that since this blog post was made, the Popplet stopped working, even on Fast Company’s site. A PDF of the Popplet is however available for download.

I’d add that being on the plane is actually a very opportune time to get things done as you can’t receive any distracting email or phone calls. Take advantage of that time.

Reference:

Initially published on Brandon Hall’s Workplace Learning Today

Where and When are Productive Managers Getting Training? Not at Work Apparently.

A recent ASTD blog post discusses the results of an ej4 study that indicates that more and more, individuals are doing their training off work hours and off site.

Their statistics indicate that employees are doing more job training off-the-job and off-hours resulting in higher current productivity numbers. Supervisors in particular, are gaining job skills for both today and tomorrow before or after work, at home and on weekends.

Since the research shows that productivity increases when managers take training on their own time, the most successful managers will have to sacrifice more of their personal time to enhance their knowledge and skills. This of course is going to affect the work-life balance, which might potentially come back and have long term negative effects on productivity.

Reference:

Initially published on Brandon Hall’s Workplace Learning Today

The Educational Value of Microblogging

Reni Gorman points out that the use of microblogging in education is a recent area of interest compared to the uses of microblogging as a communication channel for news or marketing.

In a literature review on microblogging, learning and performance in the workplace, she explains that the research around microblogging tools like Twitter is directed towards using such tools as fostering informal learning and staying in touch with a support group to foster lifelong learning.  She states however that research that examines the potential of microblogs with regard to learning and performance in the workplace is currently lacking and proposes a table of contents for a study.

Interestingly enough, Workplace Learning Today blogger Richard Nantel blogged about A Framework for How to Use Twitter in the Classroom just a few days ago, so perhaps the interest is growing in this area.

Reference:

Initially published on Brandon Hall’s Workplace Learning Today